21 – Carnival of Monsters

I know several readers will be surprised to see this Jon Pertwee classic so high, above such notable classics as The Enemy of the World or Terror of the Zygons. This is less due to the challenge that you get with the best of Doctor Who (That it’s all brilliant, and it’s like being asked which of your children you like best …) and more due to the fact that it’s a bit, well, crazy! Bright, garish, and very much a product of the 1970s, I didn’t expect to enjoy this adventure at all, which is why I didn’t bother watching the VHS version my dad had recorded off UK Gold back in the early 90s.

So I was pleasantly surprised when I found it free to view on the BBC’s channel on You Tube (sadly no longer the case), and even more surprised to find that I hugely enjoyed it! Having been pardoned by the Time Lords in the previous adventure and granted the ability to travel through space and time again, the Doctor and Jo take the TARDIS for a test drive, and supposedly land on a old steam-ship making its way to India in the interwar years. When the passengers and crew forget about their presence, then proceed to re-enact the scene they had just witnessed, the Doctor suspects that all is not well.

His suspicions are well grounded. On the planet of Inter Minor, showman and confidence trickster Vorg has brought a device called a miniscope to entertain the inhabitants. The scope contains a number of entrapped creatures, including the humans supposedly sailing the Indian Ocean. With the highly xenophobic inhabitants of Inter Minor determined to destroy the miniscope for fear it will contaminate their planet, the Doctor must find a way to escape the miniscope and return the entrapped species to their rightful homes before the miniscope is destroyed … or before the deadly Drashigs entrapped in the scope manage to consume everything they encounter!

The story is played out over three wonderful locations – the steam ship SS Bernice, the plaza of Inter Minor, and the interior of Vorg’s miniscope. The production crew manage astonishingly well for the poor budget, and while Vorg and his assistant Shirna may be dressed in the most hideously outlandish attire one could choose, it weirdly works in the context of the story. The relationship between Vorg and Shirna is one of the real highlights of the story, as the huckster Vorg tries to weasel his way to a profit, much to the cynical Shirna’s despair. Special mentions are also due to three actors who regularly appear in Doctor Who; to Michael Wisher, best known for portraying Davros, who appears in a comparably brilliant role as the Machiavellian and scheming Kalik; then Peter Halliday portrays the bumbling and officious Pletrac, a character almost as incompetent as dear Packer from The Invasion; but not least, this story is the Doctor Who debut for Ian Marter, best known for portraying companion Harry Sullivan in Season 12. All three put in excellent performances.

And that’s really why I enjoy Carnival of Monsters so much. It’s really good fun, really well acted, and reasonably clever in its storytelling. Rather like The Androids of Tara, this is a story I rate rather highly for no other reason than the sheer enjoyment I get from sitting down to watch it.

revisitations2-carnivalofmonsters

The special edition of Carnival of Monsters can be bought in the ‘Revisitations 2’ boxset – highly recommended!

Next Time: One of Doctor Who’s most iconic moments, as shop window dummies spring to life …

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