19 – The Invasion

As covered in last week’s blog, Doctor Who was headed towards an uncertain future in 1969. The show’s popularity had been waning over time, and lead actor Patrick Troughton was giving firm indications that he had little desire to stay on board for a fourth season as the Doctor. Into this mix, the decision was taken to trial a style of adventure that was to shape the next five seasons of Doctor Who; an adventure set not in the far reaches of space, the past, or the future, but on contemporary earth.

The TARDIS lands in 1960s England, broken down and in need of repair. As the Doctor seeks a technician who can aid him in repairing the broken TARDIS circuits, he is delighted to encounter his old friend Colonel Leighbridge-Stewart, last encountered in The Web of Fear, now promoted to Brigadier, and the leader of a new taskforce called U.N.I.T. The Brigadier reveals that U.N.I.T. are investigating a series of unusual disturbances centred around the world’s foremost supplier of electrical goods, International Electromatics. Forced into investigating the organisation when Zoe is kidnapped by their sinister security team, the Doctor discovers that their head, the mecurial Tobias Vaughan, is colluding with an unnamed alien menace, proposing to invade and take over the world. It is only halfway through this eight part adventure that the Doctor and Jamie learn that “some old friends” are Vaughan’s allies: the Cybermen!

This adventure was to provide one of Doctor Who’s most iconic moments, as the invading Cybermen use the London sewers to position themselves all over London, bursting out as the invasion begins. The sight of the Cybermen advancing from St Paul’s Cathedral has to go down as one of Doctor Who’s most memorable cliffhangers; sufficiently so that Steven Moffat would re-use the scene in Peter Capaldi’s debut season as the cliffhanger to Dark Water.

Even above this, The Invasion is eight episodes of excellence, principally due to the utter brilliance of Patrick Troughton as the Doctor, and Kevin Stoney as arch-villain Tobias Vaughan. While very long by Doctor Who’s usual standards, the story never feels padded, and proceeds at an enjoyable pace. The regular crew are supported by a very able supporting cast, while Nicholas Courtney very firmly seized his opportunity to stake a claim for reappearing in future. If this adventure was his audition piece, he passed with flying colours.

The Invasion is sensational in its own right; but is also significant for the groundwork it established for the future. The entire basis of the U.N.I.T. era was gestated in The Web of Fear and The Invasion, before being properly birthed in Spearhead from Space. Here lies the catalyst for U.N.I.T. (and the Brigadier) as season regulars; for earth based adventures; and for the longer stories of Season 7. As I observed in another blog piece, while the U.N.I.T. era is properly associated with Jon Pertwee’s time as the Doctor, The Invasion is not at all out of place from that era; indeed a colourised version of this adventure would fit very well indeed into the Pertwee collection!

A special mention is also due to this adventure for what it has contributed to the DVD collection. Two of The Invasion‘s eight episodes are missing, giving more than enough material for a viable release, but leaving an obvious gap. It was for this reason that this was the very first adventure to experiment with animation to fill these gaps; and arguably the work is among the very best ever done. The subsequent release of The Moonbase, The Ice Warriors, The Reign of Terror, and especially The Power of the Daleks only happened thanks to the BBC having the courage to gamble on animations for this adventure. For that alone, we should be thankful for this adventure … while still hoping we someday get episodes 1 and 4 back!

Invasion

You can buy the DVD of The Invasion on Amazon for £5.99

Next Time: Visit the genesis of the great U.N.I.T. dating scandal, as the Black Guardian decides that the Doctor is better off dead …

47 – The War Games

We proceed briskly from the first regeneration story to the second, and to a story that deservedly is described as ‘epic.’ Much like Hartnell’s final adventure was also significant for the first appearance of the Cybermen, Patrick Troughton’s swansong is not only significant for his departure, but also for the first ever appearance of the Doctor’s home planet of Gallifrey (albeit unnamed in this story). While we had met another of the Doctor’s race before in The Time Meddler (and also in The Daleks’ Master Plan – but we can only speculate on this appearance), this was the first time they were named as Timelords, and the first time we were brought to the Doctor’s home.

The story itself is gargantuan – at ten episodes long it is certainly not fit for consuming in one go. I did so the first time I watched the story (on DVD) and learned very quickly this is not how one should watch it!

It is however a very clever and engaging drama – until episode 2 you are convinced that the Doctor has landed in World War One, and it is not until later it is revealed that they are on an alien world, where a number of different conflicts are played out in different war zones. Behind the scenes, a renegade Timelord known as the War Chief is aiding the native race to kidnap soldiers from earth’s historic conflicts, using them to build the ultimate warrior race.

The first nine episodes largely involve the Doctor resolving the crisis on the planet – and while he defeats the War Chief, it is at the cost of summoning the Timelords to help return the captured humans to their rightful time and place. Episode ten almost stands alone to focus on the dramatic moment that the Doctor is placed on trial for breaking the Timelord code to never interfere. At this stage, Patrick Troughton had decided that three years was enough, and had tendered his resignation to avoid becoming typecast. With Fraser Hines and Wendy Padbury also electing to leave, the producers took the opportunity to return Jamie and Zoe to their own times, having forgotten all but their first adventure with the Doctor. The Doctor meanwhile, would be sent into a permanent exile on earth, unable to travel through time, and with his appearance changed.

It is quite interesting to see how production decisions to completely recast the TARDIS team and to keep costs down by having adventures on earth, were worked out so well in the script. But to focus just on episode 10 is to do a massive disservice to the other nine episodes. The War Games is very much to be enjoyed at leisure rather than in haste, but is a fitting end to the Patrick Troughton era. In contrast to Planet of the Spiders, you feel more like one does at the end of Logopolis – rather sorry that the Doctor is saying goodbye …

68 – The Krotons

This is quite an unusual story for me – a rare instance of a Doctor Who story that I have grown to like less over time rather than more. I suspect the principal reason behind this is that for a long time my family only owned three Patrick Troughton adventures on VHS – Tomb of the Cybermen, The Seeds of Death, and The Krotons. With such a small sample, the latter was quite well enjoyed – which I think reflects on the excellence of Troughton himself.

Why then the fall from grace? Quite possibly that although this is a perfectly enjoyable adventure, it is not the best Troughton adventure. Now that I have been able to enjoy classics like The Web of Fear and The Invasion, The Krotons is somewhat exposed as but a pale shadow compared to these stellar performances.

I concede this is somewhat harsh, because this is a quite well paced and enjoyable four part adventure, and deservedly in my top 50% of classic Doctor Who stories. It is notable as the first Doctor Who adventure to be penned by Robert Holmes, who would go on to write many classic adventures. It has to be said that the Krotons also make for good villains – threatening in their absence in the first two episodes, and imposing in their menace in the final two episodes. They would have made for excellent recurring villains.

Nor can you fault the rest of the cast – unlike in The Seeds of Death, I have the impression that the TARDIS crew wasn’t completely jaded by this point. That said, this serial also gives rise to the unfortunate line in which Troughton’s Doctor, speaking for all of the viewing audience, observes that Zoe’s intelligence gets somewhat annoying at times. Sadly, this is true – companions such as Nyssa showed that a companion could be intelligent without grating on the viewer, while companions like Adric made you long for the days when Jamie misunderstood everything the Doctor told him. Zoe never really worked for this reason – she was never annoying by any means, but it was difficult to like her.

The Krotons however is a thoroughly enjoyable adventure, and certainly one that I am glad survived the cull of the BBC records.

Thinking about TARDIS crews …

The TARDIS hasn’t had a crew for a long time. It has usually had the Doctor plus one companion, but very rarely has it had a crew – by which I mean the Doctor plus at least two companions. Of course, there are two people we can blame for this:

Jon Pertwee, who insisted that he wanted his doctor to be an ‘action’ hero (thus negating the need for an active male companion) and …
Adric, who made the Davison era ‘crowded TARDIS’ experience so miserable that JNT became convinced that Peri was a good step forward (er …)

And yet, I found myself reflecting that some of the episodes I have enjoyed best have been enjoyable principally because of the interaction between the members of the TARDIS crew. And so (tomorrow) I will be facing off the two TARDIS crews that I think are the prime contenders for ‘best TARDIS crew’ – but first I wished to pay tribute to those crews who didn’t make the cut …

We simply cannot know …
Steven and Vicki
Steven and Dodo
Ben and Polly (and Jamie)
Sadly, we just do not know how good these TARDIS crews where (although with Dodo we can begin to make an educated and despairing guess …) I have enjoyed Steven’s performances in every story that has survived featuring him as a main companion (sadly, that’s just The Time Meddler; The Ark and The Gunfighters) and would really enjoy the opportunity to see how he got on with Vicki and Dodo over a longer period. I have a slight suspicion that his three stories with Vicki would far surpass his four stories alongside Dodo.
As I remarked previously in my review of The War Machines, I wish more material of Ben and Polly survived, as they seemed to make for a good team – in the very least alongside William Hartnell’s Doctor. Having now watched¬†The Moonbase DVD release, the jury is out as to whether they made such a good team with Patrick Troughton, especially after Jamie joined the TARDIS crew.
As it is … for these TARDIS crews we simply don’t know …

Please. In the name of Heaven. Stop.
Adric, Nyssa, and Tegan
As the extras feature ‘Crowded TARDIS’ on the Castrovalva DVD points out – this crew was too heavy by one member. In Arc of Infinity we see that Nyssa would have made a great solo companion to the Fifth Doctor. Adric arguably aquits himself quite well in Keeper of Traken, and Tegan was exceptional in Kinda. Which one should have gone? I wouldn’t like to choose, but suffice to say three of them was too many.

Close … but no cigar
Jamie and Zoe
Ian, Barbara and Susan/Vicki
Tegan and Turlough
Firstly (as you have noticed) I am counting Ian and Barbara’s time as one, since Susan and Vicki effectively played the same role in the TARDIS crew. Vicki was probably a more fun companion than Susan, but Susan certainly had more mystery – making them both an even match. Ian and Barbara certainly made for an excellent crew alongside Hartnell’s Doctor – but again there is a sense that they didn’t need a pretty young companion just to get into trouble.
Tegan and Turlough meanwhile are an interesting proposition – right numbers (finally) for the Fifth Doctor, but the chemistry doesn’t quite work. One suspects this is partially because one never quite learns to trust (or love) Turlough, and Tegan’s character was perhaps too abrasive alongside that ambiguous character. Could have worked … not sure it did.
Meanwhile, I have made Jamie and Zoe distinct from Jamie and Victoria. I was struck watching Seasons 5 and 6 that Zoe does make a big difference to the crew – as the Doctor says in The Krotons – “That’s the trouble with Zoe – she’s too smart for her own good.” It made for a jolly crew under Captain Pat … but not quite a happy ship. This is a theme I will revisit in due course …

Which leaves … the contenders

As you have by now deduced, that leaves two contenders – the Season 5 crew of Jamie and Victoria, and the Season 12 crew of Sarah-Jane and Harry. Which one wins? Tune in tomorrow to find out …

(The eagle-eyed will have observed that some ‘crews’ didn’t make the cut. These include Steven and Katarina/Sara; The U.N.I.T family; Romana and Adric; Tegan and Nyssa; Tegan, Nyssa and Turlough; and counting K9 as a crew member. This is principally because the ‘crew’ existed for so short a time that it is hard to count them with the crews above)

73 – The Seeds of Death

After a short break I am back to my episode countdown – and returning to the original (forgotten) principle of bashing out a post in ten minutes – so … GO!

For a long time this was only the second Patrick Troughton serial I had watched (after Tomb of the Cybermen) – and a prime contributor to my then perception that the era wasn’t particularly good. The story revolves around returning foes the Ice Warriors, who seize control of Earth’s primary transport means (named T-Mat, years before it was pointed out that ‘Transmat’ is a better name) and plot to use it to devastate earth with a deadly fungus – transported through the eponymous ‘seeds.’ Into this scenario steps the second Doctor with Jamie and Zoe – all three actors perhaps painfully aware that they were on their way out by the season’s end.

I have to say, viewing the serial on DVD made me reappraise the story more favourably. It stands up moderately well as an alien invasion story, and the Ice Warriors themselves are superb – the episode one cliffhanger is absolutely sensational in its reveal of the enemy. The main trouble is that the series looks and feels rather tired by this stage. In this regard The Invasion was good proof that the UNIT era was the right direction to take as the show moved to colour – it injected fresh life and impetus to the show. It seemed just a little too easy to disengage while watching this particular adventure, and one cannot help but wonder to what extent the decision by the main cast to leave had upon the production team. One forgets that the show was heading towards completely unchartered territory – while the cast had been refreshed many times over, there had always been some degree of continuity. Starting in Season 7, the TARDIS team would be entirely new (unless you count Nicholas Courtney becoming a regular cast member).

For all of these provisos, The Seeds of Death is still a thoroughly watchable adventure, if a shade long at six episodes. One has the distinct suspicion that a faster paced four part adventure in the colour era would have transformed a merely good adventure, into an absolutely fantastic one.

Eleven minutes … dangit!

76 – The Five Doctors

I really don’t know where to begin in describing this simply extraordinary story. Back in the days of yore the BBC would include other videos for sale on the inside of their VHS covers. From this I learned there was a story with all five doctors (I think in my vibrant youth Six and Seven didn’t count …), the Daleks, the Cybermen, and the Master! I had to get my hands on it! In fact, so desperate was I for the serial that I had a proper huff with my dad when he joked that he hadn’t bought it, when in actual fact he had.

So … I was actually somewhat underwhelmed by the story as a youth. Because my Doctor wasn’t in it! Not really – he got gobbled up in some reused footage from the unfinished serial Shada. And it wasn’t the real first Doctor, Bill Hartnell having sadly passed away several years before. As for the Daleks, the story features exactly one (very easily confused) Dalek, and a host of easily betrayed Cybermen. The young man was not impressed.

The older me however could not help but enjoy the story. Yes they had to account for Tom Baker refusing to show up. Yes Richard Hurndall isn’t quite the same as William Hartnell. But the story is still jolly good fun! It was always going to be a thankless task to try to incorporate that many doctors, companions and foes into one coherent storyline – and the fact is that John Nathan Turner deserves credit for doing a more than respectable job of it. Credit also to Terrance Dicks for introducing an enemy well worth bringing back – the Raston Warrior Robot. Utterly deadly in taking out a troop of Cybermen, it would be a more than worthy adversary to bring into modern Doctor Who.

I would hesitate to recommend the story as an introduction to Doctor Who – compared to his outing in The Three Doctors, Patrick Troughton does not get quite the same space to shine in this story, and the same applies to Jon Pertwee. I also admit that my impression of the First Doctor was rather ruined by Hurndall – the opportunity lost here was to persuade Baker to come back and to find some way of using archive footage of Hartnell. Now that would have been a worthy anniversary story! As it is – I’m thankful for what we have got, and it makes for a very enjoyable hour of television.

83 – The Mind Robber

As I said in my review of The Dominators, Patrick Troughton does not do bad stories – and I suspect that assessment will remain upright until the recovery of The Space Pirates! That said, The Mind Robber is undoubtedly a very odd story, and one that had to grow on me before I learned to enjoy it.

For one thing, the story was meant to begin with episode 2, with the TARDIS already arrived in ‘The Land of Fiction’ where the story is set. Production issues with the preceeding story, The Dominators, meant that the producers had to add a clumsy additional episode to the front of The Mind Robber. It is handled so well however, that you would never have guessed if it had not been first pointed out – the TARDIS appearing to land in ‘nowhere’ and then exploding, in what surely must have been a very dramatic cliffhanger.

I fear I must bring in a spoiler at this point – with no reference made to the adventure in the following story The Invasion, it is heavily implied that the adventures of this story occur in some sort of fantasy world, rather like in the Matt Smith adventure Amy’s Choice. Certainly, the principal baddy who rules over the Land of Fiction while called ‘The Master’ has no connection with the evil Timelord of the same name. For a first time viewer I was more than a little bemused, if not annoyed, by the completely zany and nonsensical direction of the story, and the seeming absence of any plot. I think however, once you embrace the absurdity of proceedings, it is much easier to go along for the ride and enjoy it as the light-hearted nonsense it was intended to be.

Viewers used to the modern series ought to note a few words of warning – while great for their time, the graphics and special effects are obviously dated – not least the rather horrendous rubber suit with painted muscles for the comic-book hero ‘The Karkus’. But if you remember this is 1960s television, you will enjoy it much better – and not least the imaginative recasting of Jamie for one episode when Frazer Hines was severely ill – what could have been awkward to work around became a very interesting plot dynamic in the story, and a source of comedy as Patrick Troughton manages to forget what Jamie ought to look like!

You do need to view this story through rose-tinted spectacles and suspend a certain amount of disbelief, and you certainly should not expect any kind of logical conclusion! But so long as the viewer bears this in mind, you will certainly enjoy this story!


I’m away with work this week, so my next review will not be until Friday – will check in then!